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smorton

Apr 8 '13
Feb 9 '13
Feb 9 '13
Feb 9 '13

(Source: bookjunkie26)

Feb 5 '13
want to be.

want to be.

(Source: whiskeysocial)

Feb 5 '13

tami-taylors-hair:

curiousgeorgiana:

schmergo:

Guys, if the groundhog saw his shadow and Richard III was discovered a few days later, does that mean that the winter of our discontent has officially been made glorious summer by the son of York?

image

BOOM Shakespeared!

Feb 5 '13

jennadays:

kittydoom:

And this is precisely when I fell in love with David Bowie.

always reblog

always reblog indeed.

(Source: )

Feb 3 '13
matt-t:

BEYONCE JUST CRUSHED IT.

matt-t:

BEYONCE JUST CRUSHED IT.

Feb 3 '13
Feb 3 '13
patchworkpajamas:

Drug Users in the US vs. Drug Prisoners in the US
via http://vimeo.com/49976070

patchworkpajamas:

Drug Users in the US vs. Drug Prisoners in the US

via http://vimeo.com/49976070

(Source: anafterthought)

Jan 10 '13
jacktar207:

Portland, Maine

jacktar207:

Portland, Maine

Jan 10 '13
thereconstructionists:

She was once called “undoubtedly…the most beautiful woman on earth.” But Austrian-American Hollywood actress Hedy Lamarr (November 9, 1913 – January 19, 2000) was also one of the most important mathematical minds of the 20th century.
In 1940, shortly after leaving her arms-dealer husband and escaping to Hollywood from Nazi Europe, Lamarr befriended composer George Antheil and his wife. With her knowledge of munitions and interest in mathematics, she came up with the idea for a radio that hopped frequencies, allowing for torpedoes to be controlled remotely without detection. Antheil envisioned a way to do this with a coded ribbon reminiscent of a player piano strip. The two spent a year in phone calls, napkin sketches, and prototypes scrapped together on Hedy’s living room floor, until they finally perfected the concept and filed a patent for a “secret communication system” in 1941.
Hedy was only 28.
Her frequency-hopping invention laid the foundation for wireless communication long before computers and provided the basis for modern-day technologies like WiFi and Bluetooth. Lamarr went on to make 18 films between 1940 and 1949, including Hollywood’s highest-grossing movie of 1949, in addition to mothering two children.
Learn more: Brain Pickings  |  Wikipedia

thereconstructionists:

She was once called “undoubtedly…the most beautiful woman on earth.” But Austrian-American Hollywood actress Hedy Lamarr (November 9, 1913 – January 19, 2000) was also one of the most important mathematical minds of the 20th century.

In 1940, shortly after leaving her arms-dealer husband and escaping to Hollywood from Nazi Europe, Lamarr befriended composer George Antheil and his wife. With her knowledge of munitions and interest in mathematics, she came up with the idea for a radio that hopped frequencies, allowing for torpedoes to be controlled remotely without detection. Antheil envisioned a way to do this with a coded ribbon reminiscent of a player piano strip. The two spent a year in phone calls, napkin sketches, and prototypes scrapped together on Hedy’s living room floor, until they finally perfected the concept and filed a patent for a “secret communication system” in 1941.

Hedy was only 28.

Her frequency-hopping invention laid the foundation for wireless communication long before computers and provided the basis for modern-day technologies like WiFi and Bluetooth. Lamarr went on to make 18 films between 1940 and 1949, including Hollywood’s highest-grossing movie of 1949, in addition to mothering two children.

Sep 11 '12

Melissa Harris-Perry: Nothing is riskier than being poor in America [full video]

(Source: rachel-duncan)

Sep 11 '12

(Source: loveholic198)

Sep 4 '12

elonjames:

harmreduction:

TWiB’s Elon James White takes on the new wave of voter suppression laws.

Reblog. Reblog. Reblog. Reblog. Reblog. *BREATHE* Reblog. Reblog. Reblog…